Mugwort Magical Properties and Uses — Magical Herbs

The Magic of Mugwort

Mugwort Magical Meaning | Mugwort Magical Properties | Magical Herbs - Elune BlueMugwort is sacred to the Goddess Artemis who comforts women in labor, and it is also associated with the moon and thus the cycle of womanhood. Mugwort can be in smudging for protection and divination, and the smoke can strengthen astral projection and lucid dreaming.

Keep mugwort under your pillow to induce prophetic dreams and the incense to help open the mind during divination. Mugwort tea can also produce lucid dreams. Burn mugwort with sandalwood and wormwood to help give potency to scrying rituals.

Mugwort can also be placed in sachets to help ease the burdens associated with travel, and can be placed in shoes to help keep aches and pains away during long walks or runs. It can also be carried to increase lust and fertility and help heal disease and mental illness.*

Pregnant women should avoid ingesting mugwort as it can lead to miscarriage. To help with depression, soak in a mugwort bath, and to sweep negative energies from the home weave mugwort into your broom or besom. You can also make a protection oil from mugwort to safeguard the home.

Native Americans rubbed mugwort leaves on the body to protect from ghosts, and it has also been used to exorcise demons. Mugwort is also used to consecrate ritual tools and increase their powers. It is used ceremonially during Litha, and worn as a belt that is ritually burned to ward against evil in the next year as well as attract good luck and good spirits.

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References
  1. "Mugwort." Mugwort . N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Aug. 2016.
  2. "The Magic of Mugwort." About.com Religion & Spirituality. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Aug. 2016.
  3. Herbalriot. "Magickal Uses of Mugwort." Herbal Riot. N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Aug. 2016.
  4. Cunningham, Scott. Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1985. Print.

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