The Breath of the Feminine: Pink Baby’s Breath Flower Meaning

Gypsophila paniculata (Bristol Fairy) Pink Baby's Breath

The Magic of Pink Baby’s Breath Flowers

Soft Green Plant Care Tips Organic ...
Soft Green Plant Care Tips Organic Abstract Illustation
A bouquet of Pink Baby's Breath Flowers

Pink Baby’s Breath flower’s magic resides in its graceful feminine energy and its ability to empower the nurturing side of our soul. The flower’s presence is almost heavenly – a soft and gentle pink hue that entices the vision and satisfies the spirit. It thaws the bitterness in our hearts just a little bit and reminds us of the power and joy in compassion’s warm glow.

There are times that the world can seem cold and unfeeling. For instance, a cordial smile, a tender touch, even an affectionate hug are things we rarely experience. As a result, the distance between us grows, and closeness is becoming a thing of the past.

We need to grow in compassion and empathy to bridge the gap. We should be able to look at the delicate, soothing beauty of Pink Baby’s Breath flowers and be inspired to love, not fearing our emotions. Love, empathy, kindness doesn’t make us weak. These things connect us to others, which makes us stronger.

Pink Baby’s Breath reminds us of the importance of reclaiming our feminine energy. We have categorized ourselves into overly rigid lines of masculinity and femininity. The truth is, we are comprised of all facets – female, male, and the in-between. Therefore, we should embrace it all.

It is the magic of the feminine that we need to bring us closer to each other. There is strength in tenderness, and there is power in vulnerability. Allow Pink Baby’s Breath’s beauty to resonate with the side of you that makes you beautiful – the goodness of the Goddess within us all.


Pink Baby’s Breath Correspondences

  • Botanical Name: Gypsophila
  • Folk Names: Babe’s Breath, Gyp, Soapwort, Maiden’s Breath
  • Element: Water
  • Planet: Venus
  • Magical Attributes: Protection, Love

Pink Baby’s Breath Spiritual Meaning

There is more to Pink Baby’s Breath flower’s color than just the elegant rosy blush. It almost seems to glow against the din as if empowered by a light from within. Its pigmentation is diaphanous and otherworldly.

The ethereal, mystical glow of the Pink Baby’s Breath flower reminds us that there is something beyond our material realm. There is a world of Spirit, just beyond our gaze, that illuminates the visible world and graces Pink Baby’s Breath with a supernal, transcendent beauty.

While Baby’s Breath flowers share a significant association with spirituality in general, Pink Baby’s Breath takes that relationship further. The color pink is a medley of red, the color of passion and action, and whitea shade we associate with purity and the empyreal.

Working in tandem, they create the color pink and convey the lesson that our spirituality is best expressed through action. Furthermore, action means showing compassion to others, nurturing the seeds of the future, and loving unconditionally.

Allow the roseate hue of Pink Baby’s Breath’s flowers to remind you to ground your spirituality through your actions. Spirituality without work is inert. It needs expression through your deeds and effort to effect real change.


A Flower with Feminine Power

Baby’s breath’s magic lies in its ability to make a soft statement and is a testament to quiet power. -- Baby's Breath Magical Properties and Uses

Pink Baby’s Breath flowers are uniquely feminine in their essence. Since the 1940s, the color pink has been inextricably linked with the feminine. It is now customary in the modern-day to assume pink is a color for girls. Conversely, blue as a masculine color has received the same treatment.

This is evidence that gender roles and traditions are a fluid concept. While pink might be a color we associate with femininity now, it hasn’t always been. Furthermore, things that we attribute to masculine personalities might become more feminized tomorrow. So it’s important not to get trapped in the notion that pink things – like pink baby’s breath flowers – are “girly.”

We house both feminine and masculine energy. This explains why men can be nurturing and women can be strong. A mother can share the same drive to protect and fight for her family as a father does. Likewise, both men and women can employ the power of a gentle touch. We contain aspects of both dualities and all the shades in between, and that’s what makes us whole.

Allow the glow of Pink Baby’s Breath flowers to inspires you to express and utilize your more feminine side. The Feminine aspect is a power to be tapped into. It is the key to understanding the mystery of love and compassion. It is sagely and patient, intuitive and graceful. And it is within us all.


What Pink Baby’s Breath Teaches Us About Love

Gypsophila repens (Pink Baby's Breath Flower)

Pink Baby’s Breath flowers represent the softer, sweeter side of love. That blush of champagne pink is akin to the pink that flushes the faces of young lovers experiencing the high of a brand-new romance. It is an innocent kind of love that makes you giddy and warms you up from the inside.

This kind of love also extends to the tenderness you feel for a newborn child. There’s a certain purity in a new life that you cannot find anywhere else. An infant is without guile or deception. Their intentions and desires are sinless and straightforward. Food. Warmth. Love. It is this simplicity that makes it easy to extend limitless love to an innocent babe.

But also, Pink Baby’s Breath flowers want us to understand the importance of unconditional love. The color pink incorporates both red, the color of passion, and white, a shade that evokes piety and purity. The lesson therein is that we should express our love without boundaries, as our spirit was designed to do.

The love we volunteer so effortlessly for a newborn child or that flows without prompting someone we have romantic feelings should also flow just as easily for others. Just as Pink Baby’s Breath flowers abundantly effuse a sweet and pleasant aura, we should also be generous in the sweetness, kindness, and joy we are willing to share with those around us.


Baby Showers and Pink Baby’s Breath Flowers

Pink Baby’s Breath is a popular staple in baby showers for those expecting a girl. This is because it shares a symbolic association with all things baby – as the name would imply. Not to mention, we’re conditioned to associate the color pink with girls. Hence, the color pink and baby’s breath flowers make the perfect coupling to celebrate the birth of a girl.

The two most popular colors of Baby’s Breath flowers, besides white, are pink and blue. Pink Baby’s Breath flowers are a way to color the festivities with a feminine air in honor of the soon-to-be-born baby girl. In addition, they are also coupled in floral bouquets for the expecting parents as a meaningful gift. Conversely, Blue Baby’s Breath finds much use in showers celebrating the birth of a boy.

It’s important to note that there is a modern trend moving away from designating the gender of a child before the child themselves has assumed their own. As a result, you may want to consider the intentions of the parents before gifting them with Pink Baby’s Breath flowers as to not make the assumption for them. Fortunately, there are many other, gender-neutral colors of Baby’s Breath flowers, like yellow and orange.

Pale Pink Baby's Breath Flower.

Pink Baby’s Breath Flowers Attracts Fairies

Fairies can be a naughty bunch. They don’t necessarily play by the rules of “good and evil.” Some fairies do delightful things like help keep your plants healthy. On the other hand, there are fairies who, unfortunately, like to eat children.

Luring fairies to your garden should be a task you choose prudently. Fairies like to bring a little mischief with them. If you aren’t looking to attract that kind of energy into your life, you will want to plant your Pink Baby’s Breath near some iron. Hanging a horseshoe nearby can help ward them away, as they don’t like iron.

However, if you seek to attract beneficial fairies to your garden, Pink Baby’s Breath flowers are a perfect choice. The pacifying pink color will do its part to make sure harmful fairies stay away.

You may want to provide little offerings for the “good” fairies that visit your garden. For example, they tend to love bread, butter, and milk. Moreover, be sure never to thank them as fairies don’t like to be thanked.


A Flower for Caretakers and Those Who Care

The Pink Baby’s Breath flower is emblematic of caretaker energy – an energy that is compassionate, understanding, and empathetic. It is caretakers that make the world go round. They take care of our children with patience and tenderness. Furthermore, they watch over us when we’re ill and infirm, their optimism helping us find our way to the bright side of health.

We are all caretakers. You might be a nurse or doctor who helps nurse the body back to health. Or even a mother, father, grandmother, or grandfather who raise the young and nurture their souls. And let’s not forget the teachers, daycare workers, and nannies who watch over and protect innocent souls from harm. Or perhaps you are simply a loving, attentive friend who helps those in your circle keep motivated, uplifted, and looked after.

In the soft blush of its pink hue, Pink Baby’s Breath enables us to tap into our caretaker side. Our caretaker side is our nurturing, tender side. It is the part of us that demonstrates unconditional love through our actions and how we take care of those in need. And the fact of the matter is we need our caretakers — everyone we can get. We need more of those who give of themselves, and less who take.

Pink Baby’s Breath flowers are a wonderful way to show your appreciation for the caretakers in your life. It might be the neighbor, who looks after your plants while you’re away. Or your mother, who provides you wholesome, soul-filling meals every time you visit her. Or maybe your child’s teacher, who makes sure your child is protected and nurtured in your absence. Whomever it may be, take the time to show them your appreciation with Pink Baby’s Breath flowers. They deserve it.

Pink Baby's Breath and Daisies.

Related: Magical Flowers

Baby’s breath’s magic lies in its ability to make a soft statement and is a testament to quiet power. -- Baby's Breath Magical Properties and Uses

The Soft, Quiet Power of Baby’s Breath Flowers

Deep purple and blue violet lilac flowers.

How Lilac Flowers Attract Love and Repel Negativity

The blooming of daffodils are intimately connected to many spring festivals throughout the world – including Ostara. -- Daffodil Magical Properties and Uses

The Intimate Connection Between Daffodils and Ostara

Jasmine is a love-drawing herb, but not just any love; Jasmine attracts spiritual love, perfect for those searching the world for their soulmate. -- Jasmine Magical Properties and Uses

Using Jasmine Flowers to Attract Your Soulmate


*FDA Disclaimer

The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not render medical or psychological advice, opinion, diagnosis, or treatment. The information provided through this website should not be used for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease. It is not a substitute for professional care. If you have or suspect you may have a medical or psychological problem, you should consult your appropriate health care provider. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. Links on this website are provided only as an informational resource, and it should not be implied that we recommend, endorse or approve of any of the content at the linked sites, nor are we responsible for their availability, accuracy, or content.

Caring for Daisies | The Care and Feeding of Your Daisy Plant

Shasta Daisies Close Up | Caring for Daisy

Caring For Daisies

Daisies are children of the sun. They follow it dotingly as it makes its trek across the sky. Without the sun, they will close up their petals and deprive us of their splendid beauty.

Key to the caring for daisies is understanding the flower’s intimate relationship with the sun. Moderating how much sunlight your daisies are exposed to is essential to raising a healthy plant with gorgeous blooms.

As a general rule, daisies enjoy full sunlight. Some types of daisies will tolerate a little shade, like echinacea, but for the most part, shade tends to weaken daisies, leading to anemic growth and less ample blooms.

You must strike a delicate balance between making sure your daisies get the sunlight they need while protecting them from what can be the ravaging rays of the burning sun. The mildness of morning light is a gift, especially for more delicate daisies such as Gerbera, which performs its best under the Sun’s rays muted by the crisp, forenoon temperatures.

With proper care and attention, you will find that daisies are actually quite easy to grow and maintain. Just do your best to understand the relationship your daisies have with the sun. Seek to fulfill its desire to bask in its glow while doing your part to give them the water that they need, and you will be rewarded with beautiful blooms that last all season long.


Choosing Daisies

You will find that you have a whole spectrum of color, shapes foliage types to choose from when considering which type of plant to start your daisy-growing journey.

Don’t feel pigeon-holed to strictly the white variety of daisy when the daisy colors run the gamut from bubblegum pink to bumblebee yellow; daisies that are lilac purple, fire orange, and even deep candy red. [2]

The foliage can also vary depending on which daisy plant you choose. Some daisies have shrubby foliage, like the cool-loving Marguerite daisy. Others have foliage that resembles a fern, like the boldly-colored painted daisy.

Something to also consider when picking the right daisy is whether or not you seek the perennial variety, with blooms you can look forward to all year round, or the annual variety, which stuns with its blooms once yearly.


It Starts With The Seed

When starting daisies from seed, be sure to sow your seeds early into Spring. Expect that it will take about 10-20 days for the plant to germinate and the first sprout to appear.

If starting from seed sounds too intimidating, you can also consider starting with daisy plugs which you can purchase from your local plant nursery.[1][2]


How Much Sun?

Daisies enjoy basking in the full warmth of the sun – something to consider when deciding where to plant your daisies. Most daisies will tolerate a little shade if that’s all that can be provided, but others can be sensitive to shade, such as Gerbera daisies.[1]


Watering Your Daisy Plant

While daisies can be drought-tolerant, this is not an excuse to neglect their need for water. Some need less water than others, like echinacea that you will only need to water about once a week.

However, it will be important to make sure that your daisies receive water to withstand dry spells. They are also quite thirsty when they are blooming.

When you water your daisy plant, aim the water at the base of the plant, avoiding the flowers. This will lessen the risk of mold developing on your plant. Also make sure that your soil is well-draining, as pooling water can lead to undesirable maladies for your plant, such as mold and rot. [2]


The Green Thumb Rule

To keep your daisies robust and healthy, trim or pinch off any dying or decaying flowers. This action, called deadheading, will help encourage your daisies to bloom more abundantly, as your plant will dedicate its energy to parts of the plant that can use the strength, as opposed to being weighed down by withering flowers.

Daisies tend to winter well, especially Marguerite daisy and echinacea, with proper preparation. However, they may not survive freezing temperatures. Do your part to protect your daisies from the elements by loosely applying mulch around the base of the plant. [2]


Gerbera Daisy: Botanical Name: Gerbera jamesonii

Gerbera daisies are highly treasured for their brightly-colored, dramatic blooms. They are exceptionally versatile, being able to grow both indoors and outdoors.

A native of Africa, Gerbera daisies are a glutton for sunlight, without which they will not flower. However, they cannot withstand the sun at its harshest heat. The balance between heat and light will need to be moderated.

Strategically plant your Gerbera daisies in a place where they will have access to the subtle warmth of morning light. This place should also provide them some protection from the direct heat of the blazing afternoon sun.

Gerbera daisies are also known as Transvaal daisies or Gerber daisies. They tend to bloom in hues of porcelain white, sparkling pineapple yellow, blush pink, fuchsia, and tangerine orange. Their wonderful color array makes them a much sought-after inclusion in Easter bouquets. [13][14]


Caring for Gerbera Daisy

Caring for Gerbera daisies will require a little more attention to detail and care than you would give other, hardier daisies.

Soon after you open your Gerbera seeds, you will want to act quickly to plant them, as they lose viability rather rapidly once opened. Locate a spot in your garden that receives indirect sunlight to sow them.

Gerbera daisies love copious amounts of sunlight but will struggle if left to deal directly with the potent rays of the fervent sun head-on. This is especially true of afternoon sunlight, which can overwhelm the plant with acute heat.

While a little shade doesn’t prove to be a hindrance for most daisy varieties, with Gerbera daisies, shade can affect the quality of your plant. Gerbera daisies need full sunlight to produce their best and brightest blooms. As a consequence, the more time Gerbera daisies spend in the shade, the fewer blooms they will have.

Try to water your Gerbera daisy in the morning so that the leaves dry out throughout the course of the day. This will help prevent the plant from developing mold. [15]


African Daisies: Botanical Name: Osteospermum

The beauty of African daisies is stunning, captivating, and hypnotically mesmerizing. It entrances with its softly muted hues such as Tuscan sun yellow, Lapis blue, and Fuschia. It blends these colors seamlessly and fluently, bewitching the eye, and indulging the senses.

With other names such as Blue-Eyed beauty and daisybush, the African daisy tends to bloom in copious abundance. The flowers bloom in such exuberance that they blanket the deep, emerald green foliage generously, to breath-taking effect.

African daisies are native to Africa. They bloom late in the summer as they prefer the cooler temperatures found in the late summer season. The foliage, however, will remain plush and evergreen all year round.[3]

African Daisy’s scientific name is osteospermum. It comes from the Greek word osteon, meaning “bone” and the Latin word spermum, which means “seed.” [4]


Caring for African Daisy

African daisies are the children of Africa, the great cradle of life. There, they enjoyed the full warmth and power of the sun. You will want to simulate this experience when you go to plant your African daisies. In addition, seek out a place in your garden where they can bask in the warmth of the sun uninhibited.

You will want to aerate your soil to fluff it so that it drains water more adequately. Moreover, this will help make sure the soil properly drains water instead of pooling it. Finally, this will help prevent your African daisies from developing decay, mold, and rot.

Use a garden till or shovel to break up and aerate the soil to a decent depth. 12 inches is optimum. In addition, you can add supplements such as pearlite, mulch, and compost can help keep the soil from condensing.

Be attentive to your African daisies’ need for nourishment by adding fertilizer or nutrient-rich compost to the soil. This will fortify the plant, making it more capable of producing its stunning blooms year after year.

African daisies are quite tolerant in that they can weather soil that’s dry or poorer in quality. Just do your best to provide the best conditions for your plant, but don’t overwhelm yourself in seeking perfection. [19] 


Shasta Daisy: Botanical Name: Leucanthemum x superbum

When you think of daisies, it’s usually the Shasta daisy that you picture in mind. It has that classic daisy appearance – white flowers with a yellow disc.

Shasta daisy is named for Mount Shasta, as its brilliant white petals resemble the color of freshly-fallen snow.

They are easy to confuse with their close counterpart – the oxeye daisy, but Shasta daisies are actually larger than oxeye daisies and not as invasive.

While Shasta daisies are perennial, their blooms are short-lived. The flowers will only return after a few years before they stop blooming. You will want to introduce new Shasta daisy seeds into your garden to keep the beautiful blooms coming. [5][6]


Caring for Shasta Daisy

Shasta daisies love their sunlight, so be sure to give them full sun. They will grow just fine if cast by a little shade; just make sure the shade is at a minimal.

It is important to sow your Shasta daisy seeds after the danger of the last frost has passed. Shoot for spring or early summer, although this can vary depending on where you live.

When it comes to watering, it’s much better to underwater your plant than overwater, as overwatering can lead to problems such as mold or rot.

Provide rich, fertile soil that drains well for your Shasta daisies if you seek a healthy plant with beautiful blooms. [16]


Marguerite Daisy: Argyranthemum frutescens

The Marguerite daisy is a native of the Canary Islands, a place so beloved for its picturesque beauty that many movies have been filmed there, such as The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy and Solo: A Star Wars Story[24]

As a perennial, Marguerite daisies will bloom year after year. You can find them in any number of colors, from lemon yellow, hot pink, and magenta.

It might be easy to confuse Marguerite daisies with Shasta daisies, as they look so similar. But in fact, Marguerite daisies tend to have more rounded petals than Shasta daisies.

Another difference you will find between the two is that Marguerite’s daisy foliage resembles a shrub. In comparison, Shasta daisy foliage consists of glossy, deep green leaves.

Marguerite daisies are also known as the Paris daisy, and in fact, the french word for daisy is marguerite[7]


Caring for Marguerite Daisies

Marguerite daisies are quite fond of cool weather and are tolerant of surprisingly low temperatures. However, as freezing temperatures can spell the downfall of many plants, so too will Marguerite daisies succumb to frigid cold. [8]

If you live in an area where temperatures reach freezing or below, you can protect your Marguerite daisy roots with a blanket of mulch at the base of the plant. The mulch will help insulate the plant’s roots so that they don’t freeze during the winter.

Like most other forms of daisy, marguerite daisies enjoy full sunlight, but a little shade won’t hinder that plant’s growth too much. Prune the plant regularly to keep it in tip-top shape. For a robust plant that is bushy and vibrant, deadhead spent flowers regularly by pinching them off using your thumb and forefinger. [17]

Painted Daisy: Botanical Name: Tanacetum coccineum

With blooms in bright, bold colors such as magenta, bubblegum pink, and ruby red, and the distinctive, banded patterns that color the petals, you would think that the Painted daisy’s color is…well…painted on. But alas, this is quite a natural phenomenon and part of the magical eye candy of the Painted daisy.

Not your typical daisy, the Painted daisy flowers grow atop long, wiry stems. These stems make them very suitable for use in cut flower arraignments. The painted daisy’s foliage is also unique in that it closely resembles a fern.

Painted daisies, also known as pyrethrum, are native to southwestern Asia. Its genus name, tanacetum, comes from the Greek word athanatos, which means “immortal”. This is because its flowers tend to last a long time. [9]


Caring for Painted Daisy

Painted daisies do best when they have access to full sunlight, however, they will tolerate a little shade if that’s all that can be provided.

Painted daisies are quite the pest repellent, and an ingredient within painted daisies is even used in pesticides — a testament to its strength to repel insects. Plant them strategically in your garden wherever you wish to ward off unwanted insects and allow them to protect your other plants.

If you want your painted daisy foliage to reach peak bushiness, pinch back the longer stems in the spring. [18]


Echinacea: Botanical Name: Echinacea purpurea

It might surprise you to find out that Echinacea is a daisy. Nevertheless, Echinacea is part of the daisy family — asteraceae.

Echinacea is also known as Pink Shimmer. It has characteristic taffy pink blooms and a center shaped like a cone, hence its other moniker, coneflower.

Your chances of finding Echinacea in the wild greatly increase if you happen to live in central and eastern North America. They tend to enjoy the dry prairies and wooded areas found therein. [10]


Caring for Echinacea

In order to germinate properly, Echinacea seeds need to experience a period of cold and extra moisture. The plant is used to woodland conditions, so it doesn’t mind a little shade as long as it gets at least four hours of sunlight throughout the day. [11]

For your Echinacea plant to be at its strongest, it will need at most 8 hours of sunlight a day. Echinacea can persist on as little as four hours of sunlight a day, but the less sunlight it receives, the weaker its stems will be. Lack of sunlight can also result in the plant developing powdery mildew.

If you’d like to feed your plant nutrients with a little bit of compost or fertilizer feel free to do so. However, you will want to use these sparingly. Overfeeding Echinacea can cause the plant to bloom fewer flowers and create an abundance of foliage instead.

You don’t need to water Echinacea every day. At most, your Echinacea plant will need about 1 inch of water per week. [20]


Shasta Crazy Daisy: Leucanthemum superbum Crazy Daisy

The Shasta Crazy daisy is the wild child of the daisy family. It has characteristic shaggy blooms that make it look more like a rebel rockstar than a dainty and delicate flower,

Shasta Crazy daisies have double blooms, which means double the flower power. The double blooms almost give it the appearance of a cheerleader’s pom rather than a daisy.

You can enjoy the Shasta daisy’s eccentric blooms as they flower early to late summer. Outside of that, the plant produces gorgeous, deep green foliage. The foliage will provide an arresting feast for the eyes despite the absence of flowers.

Butterflies are quite fond of Shasta daisies. If you’re looking to attract butterflies to your garden, be sure to plant them.[12]


Caring for Shasta Crazy Daisy

Caring for Shasta Crazy daisies is pretty much standard and relatively easy. Provide your plant with well-draining soil, allow them full access to sunlight, and you should be rewarded with gorgeous blooms for minimal effort.

Good drainage matters particularly during the winter months, in which water pooling around your Shasta daisy plants can significantly compromise their health.

If you live in an area that gets quite hot during the summer months, you may want to plant your Shasta Crazy daisies in an area that gets just a little shade.[21]


*FDA Disclaimer

The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not render medical or psychological advice, opinion, diagnosis, or treatment. The information provided through this website should not be used for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease. It is not a substitute for professional care. If you have or suspect you may have a medical or psychological problem, you should consult your appropriate health care provider. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. Links on this website are provided only as an informational resource, and it should not be implied that we recommend, endorse or approve of any of the content at the linked sites, nor are we responsible for their availability, accuracy, or content.

A Time to Purify: Herbs for Imbolc — Wheel of the Year

Imbolc is a time of purification and clearing away all that doesn’t serve you in preparation for the bounty of future harvests. -- Herbs for Imbolc

The Magic of Imbolc

In the belly of the Goddess, something is stirring. It is time for the earth to awaken from the dormancy of the winter and create life anew. Just beneath the winter snow, the seeds of life are preparing to spring from their shell and break through the thawing ground. You can feel it in the air – a freshness of feeling. A rebirth is underway.

The herbs, flowers, and trees that many associate with Imbolc help us understand the magic behind the sabbat. Through their magical uses, symbology, and lore we can understand the enchantment that is taking hold, as what is dead is reborn, and what is old becomes new.

Sun-like, golden flowers like celandine and tansy remind us of the significance of the news cycle, a chance to start again. A reset for all that is past. Heather and Blackthorn help us understand it is that time to initiate new plans and prepare for the harvest you want to see in the future. Till the fields, choose the seeds, and be mindful that you can only reap what has been sown.

Many Imbolc flowers and herbs, such as Bay Laurel and Angelica, make clear the importance of purification and cleansing to be better prepared for the coming seasons. It’s quite traditional to engage in “spring cleaning” during this time for this very reason.

Through the burning of Myrrh resin, we are placed in a spirit of reflection and somber contemplation. Reflection breeds wisdom, and wisdom makes it easier to navigate whatever the year may have in store for you.

The magical herbs of Imbolc have a story to tell about the magic of the season. As you take time now to learn about these herbs and their deeper significance to the Imbolc Sabbat, perhaps you will walk away a bit more enchanted and in awe of Nature and the magical signs, she shows us every day.

Imbolc is a time of purification and clearing away all that doesn’t serve you in preparation for the bounty of future harvests. -- Herbs for Imbolc

The Magic of Angelica

Angelica can be grown near the home to provide protection. Use it in purification baths to cleanse negative energy. Smoking angelica leaves is said to cause visions. -- Angelica Magical Properties and Uses #Herbs for Imbolc

The power of the archangels resides within Angelica, hence its botanical name, Angelica Archangelica. Angelica can be grown near or within the home to provide protection. Usually, the root is what is used in magical workings.

Sprinkle some angelica along with the four corners of your home or around the perimeter to ward it off from evil. Angelica can be used in purification baths to cleanse negative energy, and smoking angelica leaves is said to cause visions.

Angelica has powers of luck and its energy can draw good fortune, as well as provide a little extra blessing of emotional balance and harmony to one’s life.

The Magic of Basil

Basil reminds us of the charming nature of the Imbolc season; the sweet innocence of new life and new love just beginning to bud. It can be rubbed on the skin to act as a perfume that attracts love.

Basil’s saccharine and aromatic scent has been known to soothe tensions that can arise between lovers, helping them find their way to sympathy and understanding.

The legendary “witches herb,” it was once thought that witches would drink a ¼ cup of basil before flying off into the air. When strewn on the floor, it repels maligned energies, as where basil is, evil cannot exist.

The Magic of Bay Laurel

Imbolc is a time of purification, and Bay Laurel is a purification herb par excellence. Burn a bay laurel smudge or scatter bay laurel leaves around the home to banish negative energies. -- Bay Laurel Magical Properties and Uses #Imbolc

Imbolc is a time of purification. It is a time for clearing away all that doesn’t serve you in preparation for the bounty of future harvests. Bay laurel is the perfect herb for the occasion, as it is a purification herb par excellence.

Burn a bay laurel smudge or scatter bay laurel leaves around the home to banish away any dark energies that may linger back to the cold dark of from whence they came.

Place bay laurel under your pillow and allow it to color your dreams with prophetic revelations that may help inform your decisions and planning for the coming seasons. Bay laurel can be burned to inspire psychic visions, and included in brews to empower clairvoyant abilities.

The Magic of Blackberry

Blackberry is associated with Brigit, the Celtic goddess of poetry and healing who is honored on Imbolc. Blackberry is a powerful healing plant, and it is believed that passing under a blackberry bramble bush that forms a natural arch can heal all sorts of maladies. -- Blackberry Magical Properties and Uses | Herbs for Imbolc

As Imbolc arrives, it’s time to reinvigorate the body and prepare it for all that will unfold throughout the year. Blackberry lends itself to this pursuit quite nicely, as it is a powerful healing plant.

Imbolc is also known as St. Brigid’s Day, named for the Celtic goddess of poetry and healing, and the blackberry plant is associated with her as well. There is even an old healing ritual involving blackberries that invokes the goddess herself.

If you happen to find yourself in the presence of a blackberry bramble bush that forms a natural arch, be sure to pass under it, as it is said doing so can cure all sorts of maladies.

The Magic of Celandine
Celandine’s power is to break chains. It can free the mind of depressive mindsets and its protective power visits in the courtroom, providing an avenue by which judge and jury may be inspired to change their minds and grant a more favorable judgment. -- Celandine Magical Properties and Uses | Herbs for Imbolc

As the earth begins to break free from Winter’s icy grasp, and the seeds in the womb of the Earth Mother stir and vibrate in anticipation of releasing new life into the world, we are reminded that Imbolc is a time for freedom – a time for Nature to discard her wintry shells and begin the cycle of life anew.

Celandine’s power is to break chains. In the vibrancy of its yellow color is a magic that has been used to free the mind of depressive mindsets. Its protective power visits the courtroom, when freedom is in the balance, providing an avenue by which judge and jury may be inspired to change their minds and grant a more favorable judgment.

Practice caution when using celandine, as immodest doses can be toxic. Its name comes from the Ancient Greek chelidṓn, which means swallow, as the ancients say that celandine blooms when the swallow returns and fades as the swallow flies away.

The Magic of Coltsfoot

As the Sun returns and prepares to leave a blooming landscape in its wake, coltsfoot is among the first to herald its arrival. The flower is one of the earliest to bloom, sometimes as early as February, just in time for the Imbolc season.

Coltsfoot will only unveil its stunning dandelion yellow petals at the promise of warmth and sunlight. In its dazzling golden bloom, it seems to trumpet the return of the Sun and the assurance of love and peace on the horizon. And in the wake of the love shared between the Sun and the Goddess, life is reborn anew, and Spring will blossom soon.

Coltsfoot can be used in love sachets to attune your soul and vision to Love’s energy. It is an herb that inspires peace and has divinatory applications, as the leaves can be smoked to induce visions.

Medicinally, coltsfoot leaves and flowers are used in cough remedies. In fact, its genus name tussilago means “cough dispeller.” Practice great care and consume coltsfoot very sparingly, as it contains alkaloids that can attribute to liver disease.
Pregnant and breastfeeding women should steer clear of consuming coltsfoot, as these alkaloids can be passed on to the child with toxic results.

The Magic of Heather

Heather can be burned with fern outside to attract the rains that will allow Spring flowers to grow. Its ethereal beauty seems to call beyond the veil and has been used to conjure ghosts. White heather is particularly lucky, and can double as an added protection against rape and violence. -- Heather Magical Properties and Uses #Imbolc

On Scottish moors and heathlands, curious magic takes place, as the hills are alive with the beauty and majesty of the heather flowers that grow there widely and with abandon.

The enlivened enchanted purple glow of the heather plant is a beloved treasure to the locals, and many a poem has been written in tribute to its inspiring and captivating beauty.

Heather is a plant steeped in magical potential. It has been said that heather “is a suitable tree for the initiation of Scottish witches.” This magic extends to all that would proceed to initiate a new path or journey, and as Imbolc is a time of planning for the future, heather’s power is right in line with these pursuits.

Heather has a plethora of magical uses. It can be burned with fern to attract the rains that will allow Spring flowers to grow. Heather’s ethereal beauty seems to call beyond the veil and has been used to conjure ghosts. White heather is particularly lucky and can double as an added protection against rape and violence.

There are many magical ways you can incorporate the magic of heather into the Imbolc season. Heather branches make wonderful besoms, perfect for cleansing lingering unwanted energies headed into the time of planning. The branches can be woven into lovely wreaths that will invite good fortune to the home.

The Magic of Iris

Considered a birth flower of February, Iris shares a name with the goddess of rainbows and new beginnings. Iris flower and orris root both can be used in rituals for purification. Place fresh iris flowers in an area you wish to usher in vibrant, cleansing energy. -- Iris Magical Properties and Uses #Imbolc

During the Imbolc season, there are two worlds at play: the evidence of the winter season, as layers of snow, have finally started to thaw and trees shrug off their coat of frost, and the imminence of Spring, and a new life begins to form just below the ice, and the Earth vibrates and warms with the Sun’s ever-nearing energy.

Iris is a symbolic reminder of this duality. While in the world seen, above ground, there exists a delicate flower of otherworldly beauty, just below the surface in a world unseen exists a root system steeped in mystical energy.

With a scent similar to that of violet, the energy within Iris root — more commonly known as orris root — weaves its way into the subconscious mind, helping to uncover the hidden worlds and knowledge tucked away within the psyche. Its powder can help intersperse divinatory revelation into dreams, and it is associated with the moon and the realm of intuition.

Iris flower and orris root both can be used in rituals for purification. Place fresh iris flowers in an area you wish to usher in vibrant, cleansing energy. The three petals of the iris flower represent the highest of ideals – faith, valor and wisdom.

Considered a birth flower of February, Iris shares a name with the goddess of rainbows and new beginnings. In her wake, she creates the rainbow with her cloak woven of multi-colored flowers, thus connecting heaven and earth.

Iris shares numerous connections with death and the Underworld. Cross-culturally iris has commonly been used to adorn the final resting place of the dead. Ancient Greeks would place purple iris flowers on the graves of young women, in hopes that the goddess Iris would show compassion on their souls and shepherd them into heaven.

It is said that the iris flower was one of the flowers Persephone and her nymph friends were gathering before she was woefully abducted by Hades into the Underworld.

The Magic of Myrrh

Myrrh is a purifying herb. The smoke can be used to cleanse and consecrate magical tools and talismans. It is usually coupled with frankincense and together the smoke of both resins work to raise powerful magical vibrations, banish negative energies, and provide protection. -- Myrrh Magical Properties and Uses #Imbolc

While Imbolc is a time to celebrate, it is also a time to be solemn of mind. The winter’s frost and its dangers might linger still, delaying the advent of Spring and the growing season. The Earth Goddess still remains separated from her daughter, Persephone in the Underworld below and still mourns for her loss, even if their reunion is near on the horizon.

With an earthy scent that some might call bittersweet, myrrh is a gentle reminder of the harsh world we leave behind as the barrenness of winter’s grasp releases its hold on the burgeoning font of life that will become Spring. While at Imbolc we are almost there, we are still only halfway there – winter’s throes and the dangers they may represent are still a reality.

It’s important to remember that while modern advancements have lessened the dangers that usually accompany the winter season, the cold of winter is no trifling matter. In days of yore and even in the current day, not being adequately insulated from and prepared for winter’s danger can mean certain death.

Traditionally, myrrh is a funerary herb. It was used by the ancient Egyptians to embalm their dead. It has numerous connections to death, mourning, and the Underworld, and is used to heal the sorrows of the past as well as connect with the spirits of the dead. The nuggets of resin that form when myrrh leaks from a tree are sometimes called “tears,” seeming to further myrrh’s connection with mourning and sorrow.

Myrrh is a purifying herb. The smoke can be used to cleanse and consecrate magical tools and talismans. It is usually coupled with frankincense which shares similar qualities, and together the smoke of both resins works to raise powerful magical vibrations, banish negative energies, and provide protection.

The Egyptians honored the Sun God Ra by burning myrrh at noon, and it was also burned at temples for Isis. Its name comes from the Semitic root m-r-r, meaning “bitter.”

The Magic of Tansy

Tansy was gifted to Ganymede to make him undying, thus it is often included in spells and rituals for longevity. It has had a myriad of funerary uses, from packed into coffins with the dead tobiscuits of tansy and caraway served to those mourning the departed. Ants particularly do not like tansy, however bees have been known to be calmed by its smoke. -- Tansy Magical Properties and Uses #Imbolc

Imbolc is a time that reminds us that nothing ever really dies. The trees reemerge from their frost-bitten winter shell and display new life and leaves. The seeds from the plants that have been felled by winter’s crisp snap are beginning to sprout – an heirloom of the generation before. Everything that dies is reborn. Everything old becomes something new.

Tansy is a symbol of death, rebirth, and the cycle. Colloquially known as “buttons” for its distinctive, button-like yellow flower heads, its name is believed to have come from the Greek word athanaton, which means immortal.

Tansy was gifted to Ganymede to make him undying, thus it is often included in spells and rituals for longevity. It is also associated with Hebe, a goddess often connected with youth and immortality as well as any other god or goddess that represents death and rebirth.

Tansy has had a myriad of funerary uses. It has been packed into coffins with the dead due to its excellent ability to repel insects and worms. Corpses were dressed with tansy oil before burial, as tansy wreaths decorated funeral halls and cakes made of tansy and caraway were served to those mourning the dead.

The prevalent use of tansy in funeral traditions made the herb fall out of flavor for some, who had no taste for such a “morbid” herb.

An excellent insect repellent, tansy was often stuffed in shoes to ward off mosquitoes carrying the pestilence of malaria and to prevent contracting fever. Ants particularly do not like tansy, however, bees have been known to be calmed by its smoke.

With a minty scent that is sweet like rosemary, it is a common tradition to flavor dishes made with dairy using tansy leaves during the Imbolc season. However, practice care when consuming tansy, as it is slightly toxic.

It is also very similar in appearance to ragweed tansy, which is very toxic, so pay great attention when foraging for tansy in the wild. Pregnant women should steer clear of consuming tansy altogether, as it can have adverse effects on pregnancy.

The Magic of Violet

Violet can be used in spells to attract and raise your good fortune when it comes to love. This magic is especially potentiated when you add lavender to the mix. Make sure to gather the first violet you see in the spring, as it has the power to grant wishes. Carry violet for an added measure of protection. -- Violet Magical Properties and Uses #Imbolc

Imbolc is a time of rebirth and reemergence. The squirrels and groundhogs are reemerging from their ground burrows, testing the ground for frost and foraging for nuts and berries. Little green sprouts are starting to form on the once barren trees, young saplings that seem to return the trees back to life and the visage of youth.

As good fortune would have it, violets make their reemergence for the Imbolc season as well. The birth flower of February, violets don’t mind the waning cool of the winter season exciting, as they prefer cooler temperatures. If the winter months have lasted too long, chances are you can find sweet violet greens still crisp with winter frost, but perfectly edible and rich in nutrients.

While violets tend to grow wild and can be somewhat invasive, don’t make the mistake of missing the gift of the prevalence of this delicious flower! Young violet blooms can be plucked and candied with a little egg wash and some sugar or syrup for a tasty floral treat. They are also popularly baked into cakes, cookies, and scones and sprinkled into salads with divine results.

The beauty of violet is both lovely and lucky and can be used in spells to attract and raise your good fortune when it comes to love. This magic is especially potentiated when you add lavender to the mix, as between the two it created an aroma and beauty that Love cannot resist.

Make sure to gather the first violet you see in the spring, as it has the power to grant wishes. Maligned spirits and energies can’t withstand the beauty of the violet flower, so be sure to carry some for an added measure of protection.

Violets have a wonderful yet fleeting soft, powdery scent. However interestingly enough, if you’ve smelled violet once, it will be a moment before you can smell it again, as it contains a compound that dulls the olfactory nerves momentarily, making experiencing violet’s flirty aroma again a game of patience.

The Magic of Blackthorn

Known as the “Dark Crone of the Woods,” when the Blackthorn tree blooms, it marks the beginning of the Imbolc season. Blackthorn staves and wands are often used to initiate new witches into the Craft and the magic of the Underworld. The branches can be hung on doorways to protect the household from calamity. -- Blackthorn Magical Properties and Uses #Imbolc

Known as the “Dark Crone of the Woods,” Blackthorn is at the very heart of Winter, and the harbinger of the Spring. Winter begins when the Cailleach – the Goddess of Winter – strikes the ground with her Blackthorn staff. And as the Blackthorn tree blooms, it marks the beginning of the Imbolc season.

Imbolc is a time of initiation. It’s time for the initial planning and preparation needed to undertake new projects and endeavors. Blackthorn is also intimately tied to the art initiation, as blackthorn staves and wands are often used to initiate new witches into the Craft and the magic of the Underworld.

It is called Blackthorn because during the dead of winter, when the tree has shed all of its leaves, what remains is a portentous black and thorny, gnarled, and barbed husk. It is very much the inspiration behind the menacing brambles you find protecting many enchanted forests in fairy tales, most notably Sleeping Beauty.

And protect it will. Blackthorn branches can be hung on doorways that can protect the home and its inhabitants from calamity and disaster, as well as prevent dark energy from entering the home. It is customary to carve Blackthorn staves with the Norse rune thorn as an added means of defense.

There’s a reason Blackthorn understands protection – it is because it understands what to protect against. It understands the dark and cold of the winter, and the threats that bitter cold holds. It understands the Underworld and all its mysteries and is a portal to and an anchor from it.

Blackthorn is steeped in mystical and auspicious magical energy. It represents the dark side of the Craft. It is the “increaser and keeper of dark secrets.” It is linked to the Crone aspect of the Triple Goddess. To know and understand magic and witchcraft is to understand the dark and the light, and Blackthorn’s energy is there to protect you, a wizened guide as you dabble in the dark.

Blackthorn wood can be fashioned into a powerful wand that can be used for all magical purposes. Its fruit, called sloe, is a dark and edible berry, but do be advised that its flavor is quite acrid and sour unless you wait till after the first frost in Autumn to harvest them.

Watch the Video: A Time to Purify: Herbs for Imbolc

*FDA Disclaimer

The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not render medical or psychological advice, opinion, diagnosis, or treatment. The information provided through this website should not be used for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease. It is not a substitute for professional care. If you have or suspect you may have a medical or psychological problem, you should consult your appropriate health care provider. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. Links on this website are provided only as an informational resource, and it should not be implied that we recommend, endorse or approve of any of the content at the linked sites, nor are we responsible for their availability, accuracy or content.

Celebrating Cherry Blossoms: Cherry Blossom Locations and Festivals Around the World

Cherry blossoms are intensely magical, and the font of inspiration for many powerful love oils and incenses. -- Cherry Blossom Magical Properties

The blossoming of cherry trees is met with much fanfare throughout the world.  From the picturesque Potomac River in Washington to the mythic Mount Yishino in Japan, there are a plethora of magical and enchanted places to witness the beauty of cherry blossoms unfold.  Many cultures hold extravagant celebrations and festivals welcoming the magical, wistful energy that cherry blossoms bring, and cherry blossoms are beloved around the world as they usher in the promise of the bounty of Spring.

Must-See Cherry Blossom Locations

Looking to experience the magic of the Cherry Blossom Season in person?  There are a couple of places around the world known for their notable cherry blossom display and festivals.  In Kyoto, Japan 1000 cherry trees line the beautiful Tetsugaku-no-michi, which translates to Path of Philosophy.

The majestic Mount Yishino in Japan is blanketed in cherry trees. Interestingly enough, they blossom at different times and days in accordance with their altitude.  Visitors willing to trek to the countryside and see Mount Yishino’s beautiful cherry blossom array can also find quaint tea houses and shops, as well as some relaxing temples.

The Meguro river comes alive in the spring with cherry blossoms.  It flows through Naka-Meguro in Japan and almost forms a tunnel of enchanted, blossoming beauty and splendor.  A weeping cherry tree called Gion no Yozakura, which means “nighttime cherry of Gion,” can be found at Maruyama-koen Park in Japan.  This beautiful tree is illuminated at night for an unforgettable display.

In the United States, there are a plethora of notable cherry blossom festivals and displays.  Washington, San Francisco, Seattle, and Portland have significant Japanese-American communities, and as such keep tradition with wonderful cherry blossom festivals, although San Francisco’s display is mostly artificial.  You can also find cherry blossom celebrations in Honolulu, Los Angeles, and even Sydney, Australia.

Cherry blossoms are intensely magical, and the font of inspiration for many powerful love oils and incenses. -- Cherry Blossom Magical Properties

Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington

Washington’s famous cherry blossom festival would not have been possible without a very generous gift.  gIn 1885, an American photographer by the name of Ruhamah Scidmore pushed for the introduction of cherry trees into American culture.  Her efforts led to Tokyo donate 3,000 cherry trees to Washington to adorn the historic Potomac River.  In 1912, Scidmore’s dream became a reality, and President Taft’s wife, Helen, along with Viscountess Chinda planted the very first two cherry trees in America, both of which still stand in Washington today.

In Washington, they hold festivals every cherry blossom season in remembrance of this generous gift from Japan.  In fact, 2012 marked the 100th anniversary of this tradition.  The cherry blossom festival in Washington is replete with cultural performances, kite flying, fireworks, and even a parade, although none of these activities are inherent to traditional cherry blossom festivals in Japan…but it’s not the American way unless we put our own spin on it.

Hanami and the “Cherry Blossom Front”

Cherry Blossom in Japanese Culture

There is much fanfare during cherry blossom season in Japan.  The weather forecasts cover the “cherry blossom front,” or sakura zensen for 40-days straight during the month of April, broadcasting the best places to see the blossoms and what time they’re expected to bloom.  The Japanese school year starts during the blossoming of cherry festivals as it is believed that this will send students off to school with a good, fresh start and renewed energy.  Cherry blossoms are the “unofficial” National Flower of Japan.  It’s served at ceremonies and weddings and is even made into a tea-like festive drink called sakura-yu, which is made with salt-preserved cherry blossoms and hot water.

Hanami

The Japanese celebrate the blossoming of cherry trees in a festival called Hanami.  Hanami translates to “flower-viewing,” and during the blossoming of cherry trees and sakura which are non-fruit bearing cherry trees, celebrations and parties are held to celebrate the ephemeral nature of cherry blossoms and how they symbolize the transient nature of life.

Hanami celebrations are held both day and night.  “Night sakuras” or yozakuras are held in the evening and characterized by the hanging of paper lanterns.  People make offerings to the kami inside cherry trees at this time.  A dance festival called Yasurai Hana, or “Quieting Blossoms,” is held where men and women wear decorative costumes and adorn themselves with pink flowers, dancing and singing the phrase “yasurai hana ya” over and over again to hope for an extended cherry blossom season.  They also dance, sing, and celebrate in hopes and prayer for a bountiful rice harvest.

Sakura Tea from Tokyo Macha Selection

See Related: Magical Herbs

The Geisha’s Flower: Cherry Blossom Spiritual Meaning and Magic

The Immortality Fruit: Cherry Spiritual Meaning and Magic

The Queen’s Spice: Saffron Spiritual Meaning, Myth and Magic

The Wellspring of Joy: Oranges Spiritual Meaning and Magic

Ananas: Pineapple Spiritual Meaning and Magic

The Fruit of the Divide: Elderberry Spiritual Meaning and Magic

*FDA Disclaimer

The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not render medical or psychological advice, opinion, diagnosis, or treatment. The information provided through this website should not be used for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease. It is not a substitute for professional care. If you have or suspect you may have a medical or psychological problem, you should consult your appropriate health care provider. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. Links on this website are provided only as an informational resource, and it should not be implied that we recommend, endorse or approve of any of the content at the linked sites, nor are we responsible for their availability, accuracy, or content.

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