Why Are Baby’s Breath Flowers so Popular at Weddings?


Love and Baby’s Breath Flowers

Baby’s Breath flowers and weddings go together like cake and ice cream. You’ll find that many soon-to-be-wed couples will incorporate Baby’s Breath flowers in their wedding decor.

Baby’s Breath Flowers and Marriage

The result is a dazzling and captivating visual array that brings beauty and grace to the wedding ceremony. Moreover, there is also deep symbolism involved in the tradition of using Baby’s Breath flowers for marital ceremonies.

How Baby’s Breath Flowers Came to Symbolize Everlasting Love

Baby’s Breath flowers have come to symbolize everlasting love. This is because they keep their visual beauty long after they’ve been cut and even dried.

A white rose and white baby's breath bouquet with decorative silver accents.

Couples Want Their Love to Last Forever Like Baby’s Breath

Of course, every newlywed couple wants their love to span through the ages. They also desire that their love stay as delightful and enchanting as the first day their love bloomed — just like Baby’s Breath flowers.

Give the Blessing of Baby’s Breath Flowers for a Happy Union

You can let the lovebirds know that you, too, wish them a long-lasting and happy union with a gift of Baby’s Breath flowers.  Red roses and baby’s breath bouquets are pretty popular. They combine the intense romantic symbolism of roses with the enduring charm of Baby’s Breath flowers.

Soft Green My Favorite Plants with ...
Soft Green My Favorite Plants with Illustration

Baby’s Breath Flowers Fun Facts

Baby’s Breath is a member of the carnation family (Caryophyllaceae). The botanical name of Baby’s Breathgypsophila, comes from the Greek roots gypsos, which means “gypsum,” and philia, which translates to “loving.” This results from Baby’s Breath flowers love to grow in gypsum-rich (chalky) soils.

Why is it Called Baby’s Breath?

The name Baby’s Breath references the plant’s appearance. During the summer, when it blooms, tiny white flowers appear like puffs of delicate clouds, evoking the innocence and purity of a “baby’s breath.”

White baby's breath flowers in a decorative wedding vase hanging on a wall.

The Taste of Baby’s Breath Flowers

Certain types of Baby’s Breath flowers are used in ice cream, liquor, and even cheese as the plant provides a crisp texture, unique aroma, and flavor. Halva, a sweet, condensed dessert usually made with flour or sesame paste and nut butter sometimes includes Baby’s Breath flowers as an ingredient.

What Does Baby’s Breath Flowers Smell Like?

Don’t let the name mislead you. Baby’s Breath doesn’t smell like a “baby’s breath.” Many have described the scent of Baby’s Breath flowers as quite unpleasant – rancid or similar to saliva.

Baby's breath flowers wrapped in brown paper sitting on a picnic table at the beach.

A.K.A Soapwort

Baby’s Breath is sometimes referred to as soapwort, which is probably no coincidence, as it has qualities that lend themselves well to being included in soaps and shampoos.

Does Baby’s Breath Attract Bees?

Baby’s Breath flowers attract both bees and butterflies.

How Many Species of Baby’s Breath Flowers Are There?

There are over 150 species of Baby’s Breath flowers in the gypsophila genus.

White baby's breath flowers in a glass jar near a chalkboard menu and clear plastic cups.

FDA Disclaimer

The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not render medical or psychological advice, opinion, diagnosis, or treatment. The information provided through this website should not be used for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease. It is not a substitute for professional care. If you have or suspect you may have a medical or psychological problem, you should consult your appropriate health care provider. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. Links on this website are provided only as an informational resource, and it should not be implied that we recommend, endorse or approve of any of the content at the linked sites, nor are we responsible for their availability, accuracy or content.


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The Harbinger of Spring: Lilac Flower Meaning and Symbolism


Lilac Flower Meaning and Symbolism

During the Easter season, as the landscape transforms into the blossoming bounty that is the spring, curious magic takes hold — the lilac flower heads into the peak of its bloom. We are so fortunate that these paschal flowers bloom so early — earlier than many — as their tantalizing scent romances us and lulls us into the ascent of spring into summertime.

Lilac Flowers is a Harbinger of Spring

Because of lilac’s early bloom, lilacs have come to be known as one of the harbingers of the spring and a symbol of the rebirth, renewal, and new beginnings that accompany this season.

The Scent of Lilac Puts Love on the Mind

However, these blooms only last for a short time — just three weeks — a fleeting enchantment. But as they bloom and we are made to be intoxicated by their mystifying scent, a spell takes hold that puts love on the mind.

Pink and purple lilac flowers in a basket under bright sunlight.

Lilac Flowers Inspire Summer Lovin’

Hence lilac has always had a close kinship with love and romance, but more the “summer love” type of romance — the kind that warms the fires at the beginning of the summer season but cools as the autumn comes. Just like its short-lived floral blooms, the types of relationships that lilac symbolizes and even celebrates are the ones that burn brightly for a short while.

The Lesson of Lilac: Love and Let Go

Lilac seems to grant permission to enjoy the casual, flirty summer romance that may bloom and wilt quickly. The key is to enjoy it while it lasts — become enraptured in all of love’s rapturous energy — and be ready to let it go without mournful attachment.


Lilac Flowers Symbolize Change

As the lilac flower blooms and paints the horizon with bright and lively purple pops, they also signal that change is coming. Nature will soon transition into the summer season, as bouquets of color burst forth from flowering trees that will eventually bear fruit.

Embrace A Change of Pace

It’s time to perhaps engage in personal changes as well. Seeing lilacs might inspire you to do a little spring cleaning or shed some of that winter weight in anticipation of the summer.

A close-up view of white lilac flowers.

Lilac Represents Confidence

Where the lilac flower blooms, it blooms confidently and boldly, unafraid to provide such a stark contrast to the surrounding landscape with its eye-popping color. It’s no wonder that lilac shares an association with confidence and self-assurance.

The Perfect Graduation Gift

As lilac flowers bloom just in time for graduation season, it’s not uncommon to give a bouquet of lilacs to a graduate to instill fortitude and conviction. 

Close-up of pastel purple lilac flowers.

The Meaning of Lilac Flower’s Colors

The different colors of lilac flowers symbolize different sentiments.

White Lilac Meaning

Not surprisingly, white lilac evokes purity and innocence.

Blue Lilac Meaning

Blue lilac pops with such an evocative yet soothing hue that it fosters joy and peace.

Violet Lilac Meaning

The electric, bluish-purple glow of violet lilac stimulates the mystical and numinous aspects of the mind, body, and spirit. Magenta lilac rouses love and passion,

Purple Lilac Flower Meaning

Lilac, in its original, bright purple form, reminds us of first love.

A tan and yellow vase full of white, purple, and magenta lilac flowers.

Lilac Mythology: The Story of Syrinx and Pan

Syrinx (also known as Syringa) was a beautiful, chaste naiad who served the goddess Artemis dutifully and faithfully. Her mesmerizing beauty caught the attention of none other than Pan, god of the forest. He could not help but give in to his amorous proclivities, deciding to pursue the river nymph aggressively.

Syrinx Transforms into a Lilac Bush

Syrinx was frightened by the forest god’s advance and turned into a lilac bush to preserve and protect herself from Pan. This proved to be ample camouflage from Pan, who could not find Syrinx after her transformation. He did, however, notice the lilac bush with its hollow branches.

Lilac Becomes the First Pan Pipe

Thus the god decided to amuse himself by cutting off branches of the lilac bush and fashioning it into what became the first pan pipe — called a syrinx. This name coincides with lilac’s scientific name, syringa vulgaris

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FDA Disclaimer

The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not render medical or psychological advice, opinion, diagnosis, or treatment. The information provided through this website should not be used for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease. It is not a substitute for professional care. If you have or suspect you may have a medical or psychological problem, you should consult your appropriate health care provider. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. Links on this website are provided only as an informational resource, and it should not be implied that we recommend, endorse or approve of any of the content at the linked sites, nor are we responsible for their availability, accuracy or content.


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