Valerian Magical Properties and Uses — Magical Herbs

The Magic of Valerian

Valerian Magical Meaning | Valerian Magical Properties | Magical Herbs - Elune BlueValerian is powdered and used in sachets for protection and purification, and can be placed under the pillow as a sleep aid. When hung in the home, it can guard against lightning strikes and powdered and sprinkled along the threshold it can deter unwanted guests.

It is believed that if a woman pins a sprig of Valerian to her clothing, men will follow her like a child does their mother. Valerian can be placed around the home to quell couples’ quarrels and can also be placed in love sachets. When planted in the garden it can bring harmony to the home, and you can add it to your ritual space to cleanse the area.

Greeks hung sprigs of valerian on their windows to ward off evil from the home, and the dust is sometimes called “graveyard dust,” can be used as a substitute for graveyard dust in magical work. Valerian is used during Samhain and Yule celebrations, and can be added to charms and talismans for protection.

Like catnip, cats are magically drawn to Valerian, and it can be used in spell work involving cats and other animals. It is also a very powerful panacea, and can be used to treat many ailments including headaches, cramps, and digestive upset.* The name comes from the Latin word valere which means to be strong and healthy, and it is also known as “all-heal.”

Valerian is believed to be able to turn any bad situation into a good one. It is a powerful sedative, and can be used to relieve stress, anxiety, and insomnia. Place valerian in your shoes to protect against the flu, and drink valerian tea when in need of purification.*

Be careful of long-term use of valerian, as it can become addictive. Pregnant women should avoid valerian.*

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References
  1. "Witchipedia." Valerian -. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Aug. 2016.
  2. Herbalriot. "The Magickal Uses of Valerian." Herbal Riot. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Aug. 2016.
  3. "Valerian." Witches Of The Craft. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Aug. 2016.
  4. Cunningham, Scott. Cunningham's Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1985. Print.