Jojoba Magical Properties and Uses — Magical Herbs

Jojoba Magical Meaning | Jojoba Magical Properties | Magical Herbs - Elune Blue (Featured Image)

The Magic of Jojoba*

Native Americans would suck on Jojoba seeds to soften them, and then use a mortar and pestle to turn them into a salve. This salve was used to heal skin conditions, condition hair and also used to preserve animal hides.

Pregnant women would eat Jojoba seeds to help with childbirth. Jojoba is rich in vitamin E, and was also made into high-antioxidant paste which was used to treat burns.

Jojoba seeds create a wax that Is very similar to the composition of natural skin oil. The seeds also contain simmondsins, an appetite suppressant, which explains why Native Americans used it to suppress hunger.

Jojoba oil is bright golden, and is a popularly used carrier oil for the making of essential oils. It has a very long shelf life. The oil has a high level of ceremides, and when applied to the skin can help the skin retain moisture. It is a very effective acne treatment, as it is absorbed deeply into the skin, and also protects the skin from harsh climate conditions. The oil can be used to slow the aging process, and promote hair growth.

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What do you think about Jojoba and its wonderful, magical properties? Do you have any other creative ideas on powerful ways to use this plant? Is there an herb or plant you would like us to discuss? What bring you to this article today? We'd love to hear from you!

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References
  1. "Jojoba - Native American Uses." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, n.d. Web. 14 Aug. 2016.
  2. "What Is Jojoba?" What Is Jojoba? N.p., n.d. Web. 14 Aug. 2016
  3. "Jojoba Oil: Properties and Benefits." The Joy of Wellness. N.p., 2014. Web. 14 Aug. 2016.